Sudan – A 360° view on the migration and mobility dimensions of the current crisis
Sudan
What is the crisis?

On 15 April, previously existing tensions between the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) erupted into a violent conflict in Khartoum and several other cities throughout Sudan, resulting in nearly 5 million new internal displacements within the country and nearly 1.4 million mixed cross-border movements to neighboring countries.

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Who is affected by the crisis?

As result of the ongoing crisis, many people within the country are becoming newly internally displaced, while others are crossing the border to neighbouring countries, including Sudanese refugees, returnees, and third-country nationals.

What was the displacement and human mobility situation pre-crisis?

The current conflict adds to an already precarious humanitarian situation for many people in Sudan. Due to the conflict, many people within the country are becoming newly internally displaced, others are crossing the border to neighbouring countries, including Sudanese refugees, returnees or third-country-nationals.

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What situation might be evolving in Sudan and neighbouring countries in the next months?

Nearly 1. 4 million mixed cross-border movements and nearly 5 million new internal displacements have already been recorded since 15 April, and if fighting continues and basic necessities remain inaccessible, humanitarian partners estimate that cross-border movements that those figures will increase.

This section contextualizes publicly available data to understand the various mobility dimensions of the crisis in Sudan since 15 April.

KEY FACTS & FIGURES

  • Nearly 5 million new internal displacements (as of 12 October) and nearly 1.4 million mixed cross-border movements  (as of 14 November) have been recorded into neighbouring countries since the current crisis started 
  • Over half of Sudan’s population - 24.7 million people – is in need of humanitarian assistance
  • Between June and September 2023, 20.3 million people in Sudan have been facing high levels of acute food insecurity. If the current crisis continues, the number could further increase

This spotlight section was last updated on 20 November 2023. Next update is planned for 30 November 2023.

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What is the crisis?

On 15 April, prior tensions between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), led by General Abdel-Fattah Burhan, and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), led by General Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo, escalated into a violent conflict in Khartoum and several other cities across Sudan, leading to nearly 1.4 million mixed cross-border movements to neighbouring countries and nearly 5 million new internal displacements within Sudan (IOM, 2023; UNHCR, 2023)

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Who is affected by the current crisis?
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What was the displacement and human mobility pre-crisis?
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What situation might be evolving in Sudan and neighbouring countries in the next months?

Nearly 1.4 million mixed cross-border movements and nearly 5 million new displacements within the country have already been recorded since 15 April and if the fighting continues and basic necessities remain inaccessible, humanitarian partners estimate that those figures will continue to increase.

 

Disclaimer: This webpage curates public information and data. The opinions expressed in this webpage are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), nor its Member States and other stakeholders. The designations employed and the presentation of material throughout the webpage do not imply expression of any opinion or endorsement whatsoever on the part of IOM, its Member States and other stakeholders concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning its frontiers or boundaries. While the portal section has been made possible with funding from the U.S. Department of State: Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, the European Union, the German Federal Foreign Office and the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) Switzerland, the contents on this section do not necessarily reflect their official policy or position.

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