Food Security & Human Mobility

Food Security
Migration and Food Security

Both migration and food (in)security are multi-faceted, and migration poses both challenges and opportunities relevant to food security. They are both heavily influenced by negative factors such as conflict, climate change, natural hazards and disasters and poverty. In a positive way, the food industry relies upon migrants and migrants contribute to global food security through agricultural labour, while remittances can improve migrants' families access to food and increase development opportunities. Nevertheless, while a certain level of correlation may exist, it is difficult to prove a direct causal link.

Food security assistance
Emergencies, Humanitarian Needs and Policy Reponses

Food insecurity can cause emergency situations which require humanitarian and political action.

Food Security
Drivers of Food Insecurity

Climate change (with subsequent natural hazards and extreme weather events) and conflict are two of the key drivers of acute food insecurity.  

This spotlight section aims to serve as an entry point to understand the complex relationship between migration, displacement and food security, which is often intertwined with other environmental, economic or socio-political forces or instabilities. 

While food insecurity has increased worldwide, displaced populations are often among the most vulnerable to acute food insecurity and malnutrition (Global Network against Food Crises, 2022). In 2021, out of the 51 million internally displaced people (IDPs) worldwide, almost 45 million were in 24 food-crisis countries/territories (ibid).

Migration and Food Security Facts and Figures
Migration and Food Security

Both migration and food (in)security are multi-faceted, and migration poses both challenges and opportunities relevant to food security. They are both heavily influenced by negative factors such as conflict, climate change, natural hazards and disasters and poverty. In a positive way, the food industry relies upon migrants and migrants contribute to global food security through agricultural labour, while remittances can improve migrants' families access to food and increase development opportunities. Nevertheless, while a certain level of correlation may exist, it is difficult to prove a direct causal link.

Food Security
Emergencies, Humanitarian Needs and Policy Responses
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Food security assistance
Drivers of Food Insecurity
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Food Security
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
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Food Security
Gender
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Food Security Gender
Remittances, Labour Migration and Covid-19

Mobility restrictions, for example those caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, can reduce remittances flows if seasonal and migrant workers are unable to travel, which has a knock-on effect on origin households and regions. 

Food Security Labour Migration

Disclaimer: This webpage curates public information and data. The opinions expressed in this webpage are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), nor its Member States and other stakeholders. The designations employed and the presentation of material throughout the webpage do not imply expression of any opinion or endorsement whatsoever on the part of IOM, its Member States and other stakeholders concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning its frontiers or boundaries. While the portal section "Food security" has been made possible with funding from the German Federal Foreign Office and the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) Switzerland, the contents on this section do not necessarily reflect their official policy or position.

German humanitarian assistance